For eight years this curator, a firm believer in the value of Kosciuszko’s art, has sought a venue for him.

In 1796, fleeing the epidemic of yellow fever in Philadelphia,

Kosciuszko came to nearby Rose Hill, NYC to visit General Gates and Agrippa Hull.  

A little over two centuries later authorized prints of his art were to visit NYC.

 In 1817 an epidemic brought an end to Kosciuszko’s life.  While battling typhoid fever he suffered a stroke

and died in Solothurn Switzerland. Typhoid outbreaks plagued the battle worn landscape of Europe during and after the Napoleonic Wars.

It is my deepest hope that these works exhibit his enduring faith in and hope and charity for humanity.

In these times we are challenged to prove him right.

 

This effort is now dedicated to the nurses and doctors and hospital caregivers and caretakers who labor at the cost of their own health and that of their families to preserve the health of others, to the farmers, grocers and truckers and all those who work to sustain us.

It is dedicated to the common good, what Kosciuszko fought for and imagined two hundred years ago.